When is testing not required?

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This is an excerpt from the book Dear Evil Tester by Alan Richardson, available on Amazon and Leanpub. The book is based off the“Dear Evil Tester” column, an obvious rip-off of the Agony Aunt columns that have existed in newspapers for a bazillion years. I’ve just started reading the online version at Leanpub, and just received the actual book from Amazon yesterday. I like physical books, but my suggestion is to stick with the ebook. Still, I really liked the response to this question, so I thought I’d share it. – Dusty Juhl, DAQAA Vice President/Treasurer

Q. When is testing not required?
When can a person say that testing is not required for a particular product ?

Yogesh

A. Hi Yogesh,

I like questions with flippant answers. So, of course the answer is “Whenever they want”. They can equally say “Bibble Bibble” whenever they want.

But I suspect you want a less flippant and more scientific answer (Bwahaha).

My first Google search for “% of IT projects that fail” provided me with a scientific range of “62 – 68”%. I will make this complicated statistic easy for my readers by conclusively stating that 70% of IT projects fail.

Therefore, I can conclude that 100% of people on 70% of IT projects can say “Testing is not required for this particular product” and they can hold their heads up high in the hope that the project was doomed anyway. Pretty good odds.

Consequently we only have to concern ourselves with the 100% of people involved in 30% of IT projects.

We all know that “you can’t test quality into a product” therefore I can use this to conclude that the product will either be quality or it won’t, so we can’t use ‘quality’ as a justification for testing.

So basing my judgement on the preceding science; I can say: if a person has the power to cause the project to fail, then they can say “testing is not required”, at the point they make the decision to doom the project.

Making rocket science look easy,

Uncle E.

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